Gullah Sweetgrass Basket - Single Rose

Single Rose.jpg
Single Rose.jpg

Gullah Sweetgrass Basket - Single Rose

3.99

The Single Sweetgrass Rose of Charleston – Made by Gullah people.

Made by Gullah artisans for more than 300 years, people in Charleston have been weaving baskets using locally-harvested bulrush, a strong yet supple marsh grass that thrives in the sandy soil of the Lowcountry. Originally used as winnowing fans to separate the rice seed from its chaff, sweetgrass baskets are regarded among the nation’s most prized cultural souvenirs. The coiled sweetgrass basket is a historically significant example of African heritage transported by enslaved African people. Africans from the Windward / Rice Coast of West Africa had knowledge and were experience with rice cultivation and were thus particularly sought after in the Atlantic slave trade to the Carolina low country. Today the West African descendants keep the basket making tradition alive in Mount Pleasant / Charleston SC, this heritage is passed  down generation to generation from grandmother to mother to daughter and in some cases to extended family member. It is still practice to this day where the entire family members sew these baskets. The men and the boys go out to harvest the material while the ladies and girls sew the baskets

Coiled basketry, one of the oldest African crafts in America made using bulrush, a marsh like grass and palm. Both mentioned in the bible and are prevalent in Africa as well. The fact both were available in the low country was a very welcome connection by Africans coming here.

The Smithsonian American Art Museum's permanent collection includes a sweetgrass basket made by Mary Jackson of Charleston.

Sweetgrass baskets are very durable and can be used for many applications. This is a piece of art that everyone should have in their home.

The Gullah baskets we proudly offer here are made by Corey Alston of Charleston.   Corey is a great artist and great person. An Afro-American Art made by Corey and his family in the low country of Charleston, South Carolina. Corey is an ancestor of a Gullah family that has been weaving sweetgrass baskets for 5 generations. The art itself is over 300 years traced from the enslaved Africans. Today his family has kept this tradition alive and is passes the art from parent to child.

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